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Why am I so confused?

when pain seems too much

Immediately after an accident or being a victim of chilhood abuse or trauma, the normal thinking brain of the person traumatized retreats into crisis or survival mode. What does this mean?

When someone feels overwhelmed by the suddenness of an event, the fight or flight energy of the body takes over. A person quits thinking calmly and rationally and tries to survive by confusion, fleeing, hiding, fighting or attempting to placate their abuser. Usually, the ability to share feels and thoughts is avoided or swallowed to get physical support or help.

After the initial crisis passes and physical help has helped the body’s pain and wounds to go away, the emotional wounds remain hidden thin the tissues and psyche awaiting a later time to be resolved but never forgotten.

The problem is these deep seated wounds don’t go away, but leave open sores that never heal without help. Why does this happen?

The body and brain are like a computerized system that catalogs all our experiences and sorts these happenings as memories in the brain and part of the body. Example: If I was driving my car and got hit by an out of control motorcycle, I would naturally be more cautious at that intersection the next time I am driving in that location. I become more vigilant, my pulse may race, etc. These responses seem confusing, but they are a normal reaction to previous trauma.

You can decrease this confusion by simply rubbing the area under your nose above your lip slowly while breathing deeply and slowly through your belly area.

Let me know how this techniques work for you. Namaste